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, i hope you have not given it away. >> not at all. >> ok. pat and bob had graciously let us use their space. as we are moving offices, i have come upon some newspapers. where are you, sharon? god bless sharon from alaska. [applause] for those of you who are not clapping, the reason people are clapping is because sharon kept jack kemp out of a lot of trouble. [applause] i think sharon packed away these newspapers from 1980 one and heard marco mentioned the economic recovery act of 1981. there is a story behind it. the kemp history has collected much of the story, but "the washington post" saved by sharon alaska -- i got incredibly distracted by all of the cool stuff. i come upon these stories. one is from july 25, 1981. about president reagan going on to the hill to pitch his bill. the next is from july 30, 1981. this feels kind of awkward. there are two stories here. both of them have dad's picture on the front. the second expands the story of how the legislation passed. some of you know the history better than me, but asked legislation is not always pretty. and this country whe
the fiscal cliff. this included chris van hollen. also, senators mark warner and bob corker, a republican from tennessee. this is one hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al hunt. we always love having al over here. he really pu
recuperating from his wounds at an army hospital in michigan. future majority leader bob dole, another young gi, who had been also wounded in the european theater, and he told senator inouye he wanted to go to law school and go to congress. bob dole was elected to congress one year after senator inouye. senator inouye always joked, "i went with the dole plan, and i beat him. " he has been a soft and powerful voice. although he was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vital presence in the senate, and in death, he will remain a legend. his last words on earth, "aloha," and it is with a heavy heart that we did him aloha, we love you, to a legend of the senate, daniel inouye. -- we bid him aloha. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend condolences to his family, colleagues, and constituents. in late 1963, a young freshman senator stood under the splenda dome, as we do now, in vigil and in prayer. years on, daniel inouye could still remember how quiet this ever boisterous rotunda became when pre
right now. thank you. host: thank you. we could get that information as well. bob, mich. on the independent line. good morning to you. bob are you there? i think we lost bob this morning. i want to talk with this issue of age discrimination and who is on unemployment insurance. here is an article from "the baltimore sun." 93,000 young adults in maryland are unemployed. what ages are on unemployment insurance at this point? guest: historical you tend to see younger workers with less experience on unemployment, because of this recession we see a much wider spread. more people with college degrees, older people taking on income and benefits of some kind, but the challenges once you get past the six-month blocked, the longer you are on unemployment without a job, the harder it is to find a job. if you have a college degree, and you really need to get a job, to some degree you can move down the economic ladder. you might not want to, it might not be positive for society, but when you do? pg when you do that, it pushes someone -- but when you do that, it pushes someone else fu
friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young g.i. who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate and he's been a soft and powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashed progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate and in death he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha. and it is with a heavy heart that i and we bid aloha, goodbye, i love you to a friend and legend of the senate, daniel ken inouye. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend sincere condo lenses to senator inouye's -- condoences to senator inouye's family, colleagues, and constituents. in l
chairman of this committee. pablo this committee from 1995 to 1997. -- bob led this committee from 1995 to 1997. welcome, bob. retired major-general ronald siegel. he currently serves as vice president enterprise executive for energy in the environment for colorado state university and ohio state university. led a distinguished career in the u.s. air force. d.o.d. executive force base, and prior to that, director of defense research and technology. he flew two space shuttles. we certainly welcome you. >> we welcome, honorable marion blakey, president and ceo representing more than 150 leading aerospace manufacturers. ms. thank you served a five-year term as administrator of the f.a.a. -- ms. blakey served a five- year term as administrator of the f.a.a. we do certainly welcome you. but associate prof. for space science and engineering at the university of michigan, specialist in robotic exploration and space and team leader for the development for the fast imaging plasma spectrometer on messenger spacecraft. we certainly welcome you. dr. scott pages a director of the space policy instit
that. i am very old now and then these things or in a situation when we were talking to bob -- excuse me, not bob. your first name, david. david, by the way -- he is even older than i am. i want to know what he is eating for lunch so i can have the same thing. david is retired and in good shape. he has a son who needs physical assistance with prescriptions and medical costs. it makes a difference. a grown son who still needs help. you take away a couple thousand dollars out of your pocket next year, it matters. it is about $270 a month. that is real money. look, the thing that the folks around this table represent -- every one of these people are hard-working people. what impressed me most about them was they are even more worried about people who are poor, more worried about people who are out there struggling to put 1 foot in front of the other. we focused on wha tthe tax increase would mean to them. but it would also mean a great deal to the economy as well. it is estimated that this tax cut for the middle-class, if not passed, there will be $200 billion taken out of the economy ne
and bob dole and danny, they served next to ordinary people with 8th grade and high school educations. for me, all of the things that have been said about warren i could repeat and it would emphasize what you already know about them. the reason why i martin so much is the reason i just stated -- the reason why i admired him so much is the reason i just stated. i never met a man in all of the time i have served with the single exception of daniel inouye who had the grit -- in ordinary americans. the thing i like best from warren is when he said, just tell them the truth. that is what he always did. he told the truth. we all have a slightly different perspective, his honesty could be searing, but his compassion was always profound. that is a rare combination for any man or woman. he believed that the coolest lives are often told in silence. he would come up to you and say, i was flat wrong. let me conclude by saying that one of the tests in all of my years is that for warren rudman, he said the client of the realm is your integrity, and it is. -- there is a coin of the realm that is you
: it was voted down three consecutive times. host: here's an e-mail from bob and florida. making the economic argument against right-to-work state. and then there are people who have an economic argument on the other side of it. if we read a piece earlier in the washington post on what right-to-work states due to the broader economy. -- due to the state's economy? and now this isn't egypt. on the front page of the washington post, amid this turmoil, aid for egypt is on its way. the u.s. and a coalition of international lenders are pushing ahead with billions of dollars of loans and other help for egypt and neighboring states. so, money going to the country despite the violence there. and on the domestic front, the richmond times dispatch, courtesy of the newseum, health care law includes from a surprising $60 coverage free. bob in rapid city, south dakota, republican caller. caller: whee are a right-to- work state. in the past week we had an article in the newspaper that we are 16th in the nation in income. we averaged 44,000. where is the nation averages 41,000. so it's just not true that a
carney. c-span2 will be covering that live. and now bob woodward on his latest book "price of politics." he spoke with "politico's" chief white house correspondent mike allen and failing to chief a compromise. this is part of a "politico" playbook discussion. it's about 25 minutes. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to "playbook breakfast." thank you for coming out so early. we're excited to have an amazing double-header today. we are going to talk to senator rubio who last night gave a big speech, one of the first formal speeches looking ahead to the future of the republican party. we are going to talk to senator rubio about that. first we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations, is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in livestream land. we'll be taking your questions on #politicobreakfast. tweet us. welcome to c-span and to others. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year including the conventions an
a stairway to heaven metaphor, and it did not work. when jimmy page and john paul jones and john bob burst onto the musical screen, the world never saw it coming. there was a singer with the me like a lion, a voice like a being she, guitar prodigy who let people's jobs on the floor, equally at home on the keyboards. a drummer who played the dislike depended on it. when they initially kept their distance, led supplicant proud america from opening court. we were ready for what should be called songs with a lot of light and shade. it has been set a generation of young people to buy teenage aids with a pair of headphones and is up when album and the generation of parents wondered what all that noise was about. even now, 32 years after his passing we all appreciate the fact that this that led legacy lives on. the last time the band performed together in 2007, perhaps the last time ever, more than 20 million fans applied for tickets. what they saw were no frills and theatrics, a few guys that could still make ladies we get these huddled together, following the music. these guys redefine the rock
: that is a larger issue of taxes and spending cuts. caller: thank you. host: bob on the independent line from florida. caller: nobody should worry about the fiscal cliff. asey have everybody's ira's hostage. ira will have to buy ies.sur they are not worried about the budget. everybody that has an ira basically it will have nothing because interest rates will go up so high on the treasury bills in the coming decade. be heldy's ira will hostage. i took money and i put it into gold. i did not pay any taxes on it. possession is 9/10 of the law. let them come and find it. every politician should not take a paycheck. they do not deserve it. they have been bringing our country down. host: in look at what happened 1st.ing jan. uary host: that will happen in january 1 if congress fails to reach a compromise, even a short-term compromise. dan on the phone from massachusetts. caller: thank you for taking my call. i would like to know how many millionaires there are in this country versus the number of people who make $250,000 and less. i think that's where the argument can bw won e won. john boehner is
from the progressive policy institute. we have senator bob packwood from oregon, former chairman of the senate finance committee, part of the 1986 negotiations. and the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have an hour to an hour and a half. if you hear something you want to weigh in on, don't wait for me. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this issue and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table and would like your thoughts. as you heard from chairman bachus. they need ideas to bridge this gap because we appear to be at a stale mate. i turn it over to john to get your thoughts knowing he has to leave and the center for american progress has come out with some ideas and john maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, i think following up on this morning's session, clearly to have a balanced approach we need
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
the tremendous service and career of bob morton. a 22-year veteran of the washington state legislature who recently announced that he was going to be retiring at the end of the year. he was first elected to the house in 1990 and then he was appointed to the senate where he currently represents the seventh district, including stevens, and parts of spokane county. he owned a small logging business and ran cattle while also preaching at his local church and serving the community. but bob is not just an outstanding legislator for eastern washington, he's also a close friend. a mentor and the reason that i got into politics and public service in the first place. as an elected official i've worked with him on countless issues and his advice and friendship has been invaluable. he's recognized for his leadership and knowledge, good forest management, no one knows western water law better than bob and he's participated in most of the negotiations over washington water law. bob and his wife linda have five children, 11 grandchildren and i know they're looking forward to spending more time with them
on the state department during a time of fiscal austerity. host: here is a follow-up from senator bob corker who will take over as the ranking republican in the senate foreign relations committee in the 113th congress. [video clip] >> you were fully aware and either you send people there with a security or you send them there. i don't understand why you did not send a notification out, but the cables coming in, with concerns about security, why didn't you do just what you did with this -- seeking additional funds? i did not understand. the appropriations committee has never received from the state department a notification asking to shift funds for security in benghazi. i just want you to tell me why that didn't happen. you do it all the time. it happens almost weekly. >> senator, as you know, we are constantly evaluating our security posture. we are constantly reevaluating where we need funds. and we are constantly by winning the current situation on the ground in all of our countries. as you are well aware, we have risks all over the world and we are constantly evaluating and determining -
other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. he would do things on -- in secret. dole takes over baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. and -- they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. the did work together. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. if senators voted based on secret ballot, baker would have won. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator byrd. senator byrd decides to crush two democrats. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. -- the way the senate works. there is a rebellion on the senate floor. everyo
. it is not that they do not fight or have differences. but they did keep each other informed. bob dole replaced howard baker as a speaker. dole takes over maker as leader . -- baker as leader. but they kept baker informed. they just work together and kept each other in touch of what the other was great to do. they still opposed each other at times. they kept no secrets. >> i always like to talk about byrd and baker. they really did epitomize the great senate and the way things worked at that time. the first two chapters of my book are entitled "the grind" and "the natural." he was a most natural politician you could come across. it senators voted on the secret alec, aker would have -- based on secret ballot, baker would have onwon. they had a remarkable capacity for doing that. there is one incident in my book where i describe senator erred -- where i describe senator byrd. it is such an unusual act, it he gets the vice president in the chair and by a script that byrd has written, start ruling them out of order in a way that is quite contrary to the way the senate work. there is a rebellion on the sen
a conversation about getting the fiscal house in order. i heard bob talking about that. it is true. we spend $1 trillion more than we take in. it's a fact and we have to address it. i approach this issue with the following belief. the only way to get it in order is through rapid economic growth. no taxes you can raise to bring the debt down. what the president is offering is not enough but will make a dent on job creation, particularly middle-class job creation. i oppose his plan. we should do real tax reform. if there are loopholes, there is a loophole for being able to write off your yacht as a second home. let's go after that. we need more revenue and the way you do that is through rapid economic growth. it's the only way to generate the kind of revenue you need and hold it. >> what's the only way you would raise tax rates on the top 2%? >> the number one issue is to grow the economy and creating jobs. i believe that proposal will hurt job creation. the tru millionaires, they have the best accountants and lawyers in america. do whatever you want, they are go to go maximize it. the people who
. and republican senator bob corker. also on the program is the israeli a bastard to the united states. cnn's state of the union follows and welcomes the managing director of the international monetary fund, christine lagarde. at 4:00 p.m., here "face the nation"where they talked with alan simpson and erskine bowles. also on the program, an interview with cory booker. the sunday network tv shows are repairing here on c-span at noon -- here on cspan radio. listen to them all on cspan radio on 90.1 fm in the washington, d.c. area and nationwide on siriusxm radio. [video clip] >> the staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated that to cocker the land would cost 700,000 man and 500,000 of them would be maimed for life. >> i choose to honor both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way through the pacific and a little girl like sadako who died as a result of the atomic bomb. it is unimaginable with the most of them like to be close to that we're that far ball or originated and the blast was strongest. >> follow the journey th
was senator bob corker. here is what he had to say. [video clip] >> realizing that we do not have a lot of cards when it comes to the tax issue before the end of the year. it will leave the presidency and the senate in the hands of the democrats. many people are putting forward a theory that has merit where you go against the president with a 2% increase on the top 2%. all of a sudden the shift goes back to entitlements. all of a sudden once you give him that tax rate, lesser that what he has been talking about, the focus shifts to entitlements and puts us in a place where we can actually do something to save this nation. i am actually beginning to believe that that is the best route for us to take. host: senator corker, saying that there are more republicans willing to do that. you heard him lay out the strategy there. lots of debate in washington about who should give and how much. we are asking you to weigh in on that conversation and tell us what you are willing to sacrifice. this comes from a piece from a few days ago, from "national journal magazine." it is about americans not wil
to address this. [applause] >> wow. man. thank you, bob. i met him when i was 23 years old in wisconsin. i was introduced to him by my mentor, jack kemp. jimmy, your family, and you for caring on the torch. quick you close your eyes, you think you are listening to -- if you close your eyes, you think you are listening to jack kemp. it is something that is really a great honor to do this, to be here. back in this room like last year, and i want to say congratulations to marco rubio on receiving this well deserved honor. [applause] now, as you may know, marco is joining an elite group of past recipients for this award. [laughter] two of us so far. i will see you at the reunion dinner. [applause] [laughter] i am sure the press will not read too much into that one. [laughter] i want to thank you all for your kind hospitality. i want to thank you, jimmy, for holding this event. wherever i went, people would say, i work for jack kemp. that legacy lives on some much because of the connection to the family. there was something this legacy .as such reach hi it is an honor to be a part of this an. j
with china and the united states right now, and what do you see as the challenges in the years ahead? >> bob, thank you very much, and it's great to be back at csis and to be with my friends and colleagues on the panel. i very much appreciate the opportunity. i think as all of you have seen, over the last several years the obama administration, in really a bipartisan spirit, has sought to step up our game in the asia-pacific region, to increase our diplomatic, our commercial, our strategic and our political interactions really across the board. and when we think about it -- it's been termed either the pivot or rebalancing -- a key component of that is frankly our desire to improve and increase our interactions and our relationship with china. we all recognize its importance on the global stage. and frankly, the region and the world demands that the united states and china make an extraordinary effort to make sure that our relationship is strong and stable and predictable. you referred to this long history of what are often referred to as hegemonic transitions. one of the things i would say i
that will be calculated, and quite frankly, in a more simplified form been standard tax law. host: professor bob kelly? guest: when i say chaos i am -- professor buckley? >> when i say chaos, i am referring to two things. the irs has done programming based on their being a patch enacted by the end of the year. most tax returns software has made the same calculated gamble. i agree that the government needs revenue. i do not think there is any question of that. if you just say that the amt is a good tax because it raises revenue, i do not argue on the notion that we need money, however is an extraordinarily arbitrary way of raising revenue. it raises revenue not from the super wealthy. the amt applies to few people making more than half of $1 million. it is counter-intuitive. if you are going to raise revenue, it should be as president obama has suggested, shared sacrifice, and that sacrifice has to come from people making more than half of $1 million. host: how do the very wealthy get out of paying the amt? guest: because of the rate structure. the rate between $200,000 and $500,000 are at least as hig
or the other. all they're trying to do is protect their interests. host: bob is in barrington, illinois on our republican line. caller: on the matter of immigration, i live in illinois. illegals are not allowed in the .tate to have driver's licenses what is going on with our country? we have the most corrupt politicians in the united states in this state. everyone knows what is going on. they are selling our state out to the illegals and i am upset with it. if somebody breaks in my house, i'm not going to give them a bed and roof over their head. i'm going to put them in jail or kick him out of the country. host: bob, does the illinois state department of motor vehicles rulebook still say, must read, write, understand english? caller: no, i have not seen it in there. the should have kept that in there. i was in japan for four years. their rules are a lot tougher hours. we had to carry id's around. -- around 24/7. host: what kind of work did you do in barrington, illinois? caller: i worked all over. if i want to find a part-time job, it is hard. the minute they look at her white hair, they say
for small businesses. host: bob. minnesota. independent caller. caller: by an independent. i'm retired, and i am quite old, old enough to see that -- everyone that i know with -- i know has been involved in business. sometimes you are a worker, sometimes a private contractor. anybody that earns money is a business. we hire phone companies, garbage collectors, we have roads repaired. we are all business people. i am not sure why we think certain businesses are more privileged and deserve special favor from washington. -been retired long enough. every year i worked extra jobs and christmas, and in 1998 i worked at a big box store and they paid me $13 an hour. in 2007, they paid me $8 an hour. host: from twitter, how to determine which business leaders to speak to the administration? guest: we will answer bob put the question first. you make the point that a lot of people are in business one way or the other. there is a larger trend in smaller businesses, and people starting businesses from their own home. about 5000 new businesses are generated each year. we've seen through the recession
blumenthal and chris murphy. at 4:00, "face the nation." bob schieffer talks with governor molloy and paul vance. chuck schumer of new york and kay bailey, from texas. these are brought to you as a public service by the networks and c-span. the rearing begins at noon eastern. at 3:00, listened to them all on c-span radio. -- listen to them all on c-span radio. you can listen on your smart phone or online. caller: my inspiration was -- [video clip] >> my inspiration was the archives and documents about the cold war. talking about roosevelt, stalin, churchill, we know the main events from our point of view. i wanted to show it from a different angle, from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people subjected to this system. how did people make choices in that system? how did they react? how did they behave? one of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonigh
to the floor. the bill is not moving along, says bob corker from tennessee. here is what the republican from idaho had to say about the fiscal cliff negotiation. [video clip] >> if we get down to the end of the year and the only choice we have is to save taxes going up on the middle-class, i would support that. but i wish we had a comprehensive bill that dealt with spending, entitlement, and taxes altogether. that is really what we ought to do. host: that was senator johnny isaacson from georgia, excuse me, not from idaho. we will go back to the question here for all of you. we will continue to give you news from the newspapers. but how does religion and law was your politics? democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i had originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferso
with their presence. there's usually two or three of them i see. host: moving on to bob in pennsylvania. bob, how long have you been with the n.r.a.? caller: a long time. host: 10-20 years? caller: 15 years. what kind of guns do you own? caller: guns, shotguns, pistols, and i do own an a.r.-15. host: what do you think about mr. lapierre? caller: i was disappointed. i was anxious to hear the news conference and hopeful n.r.a. would come out with a reasonable response and want to lead in the middle. i believe that it's a good idea to have armed edwards in school. -- armed guards in school. the n.r.a. said they would train these people with an unlimited budget. but they stop way short of -- yes, video games and violence in our society, kids playing on these video games and the movies and the music. when i was young, we were not allowed to watch "the untouchables," eliot with robert because my parents thought it was too violent. my parents thought. and now we've come to this. there's no reason these guns should be available for sale. they have no place in the sporting arena or no place in the hunting aren
giving me the dickens. after that we became very good friends and played golf together. bob michael was a wonderful leader. there was a spirit of camaraderie even though we had differences politically then that we do not have now. now it is much more combative. i have a lot of friends on the democratic side of the aisle, very good friends. as far as working things out is not as easy as it used to be. >> what are some of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointing fingers, when we went after jim wright, newt was the speaker and jim was forced out of office. they went after newt. the combat became very personal. that is one of the things that started this movement. over time, i think it has become political as well as personal. much more political and personal. >> she said raising cain, are -- -- you said raising cain. you will the gavel for the oversight committee and use that to raise the number of investigations especially of the clinton administration. what do you see as your legacy of that tenure? >> i think bill clinton, president clinton and hilary as secretary of state d
responsibility. i can remember bob michael getting up and saying i am proud of voting for this. if you want it to the congressman vote for somebody else. that is a gutsy thing to do. he kept getting reelected. host: john from pennsylvania. caller: thank you for having me. i think the problem is in gdp. we do not produce anything. we do not create any jobs. as far as china is concerned we do not hit that high of a tariff on their imports. i believe it is a lot higher. the whole thing was steve jobs. he treated the apple computer in his garage. when he got successful theme of his company over to china giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he would not even be able to create the apple computer. we just do not do enough for the people of this country. the people who are position to create jobs do not reinvest in the country. i do not think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giant tax breaks given to those who want to invest in the country and create jobs. for a lower than the american businessmen. guest: i understand your frustration. part of i
warriors and the chamber of commerce and john kerry and bob dole. it was voted down including five key votes from friends and colleagues of bob dole. it was all over what the senate foreign relations committee -- the hearings indicated the black helicopters were not coming. this was not some crazy requirement on america. we already have the standard. it was that 26 other countries have ratified this. it went down. i am still trying to understand the opposition. >> would you think? >> i think it is fear. it is not based on fact or reality. someone is able to hype this notion we are agreeing to a one world government by ratified this treaty which simply embodies what has been our law for decades. the chamber endorsed it. but there is this year. -- but there is this fear of the government and being required to be accountable for having health insurance, the so-called mandate, even though there is help if you need it. >> the velocity of information through social media, radio, and tv, there is a lot of false information and it gets amplified so rapidly now. it is very hard for the facts to
political capital for fights over the budget and immigration reform. next is bob from new york city. caller: thank you. i can read your transparent republican leanings, but god bless you, you are entitled to them. host: i do not know how you can read that, but go ahead. caller: this is a very interesting political domino going on with susan arise. it is leading possibly to kerry or scott brown, your man in massachusetts that lost. you know, if i were president obama, i would look to play this game of chess differently. i do not know if i would look to an joe lieberman or somebody completely unexpected. i would keep john kerry out of it and i would play the political game of chess that is being forced imam the president. i would like to say -- i agree with the former callers and really the woman from florida talking about how we should not be rigid we should be making decisions about what is best for america. i would like to finish and say this deficit and debt is all about health care costs. mostly the costs are humongous. they are not micromanaging and looking at health care costs and ways
, i had the privilege of being with him. we stopped with bob dole as well. they were on a mountain top, literally as the crow flies, i think it was only two miles on the same day, both mortally wounded in fighting for their country. just above the bridges above custody. because of danny's sense of honor, that is the only thin i can ascribe it to. his loyalty first and foremost to his platoon, to the men he had sworn he would protect. he would do everything in his power to protect them. this is a man who kept fighting on that ridge even after his arm was severed. crying a grenade out of his severed arm and charging the next machine gun nest, taking it out in the process saving his men. he was awarded the medal of honor for incredible bravery. he did not do it because he was brave. he did it because he was loyal. he did it because of a sense of duty. he did it because this was his country. robert could have been talking about danny when he said -- when will the fis fear, when duty throws the gauntlet down to fete, when honor scorns to compromise with the death, that is heroism. in every
there is duplication. there are clearly areas where we can provide greater efficiencies. we were able, bob gates before me begin that effort. we have added about $60 billion on top of that in terms of further efficiencies. we will continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. i ask that question when i first became secretary. what is the role of the service secretary visa be the service chief? the reality is that there is an important role for them. they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. the also have to negotiate a lot of the politics. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. having said that, there are a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon and we will. >> at the defense department deals with downsizing services, have you considered cuts to the number of flight in general officers? >> i think that is part and parcel. as you do force reduction, we will be reducing the structure and i think as that happens, they have to review not just the reductions in our troops but also th
will have failure. >> i will turn to the audience -- bob? >> i wanted to respond to the entitlement piece. i am a huge fan of paul ryan. i think the guy -- regardless of if you agree, he puts things out there and things about them. i think on entitlements it is very unfortunate the ryan budget did not do anything in the first 10 years. that created an unfortunate set of expectations. i agree -- $27 trillion of unfunded liabilities down the road. we can make changes right now to the medicare program that is not painful to seniors but painful to politicians. we can begin -- it begins to do the things we need to do. the best thing we can do for our country, the best thing we can do for those people struggling for jobs is to go ahead and do this now, put it in the rearview mirror. the only thing lacking is not intellect but political courage. secondly, we have to have entitlement reform that is real. this is where the money is. on the revenue case -- if you can get two people in the room, we can move beyond red lines as tim was saying and resolve this. among the mass of people on the democratic
directly to their members. to avoid this sequestration. >> bob sam mills from "the washington post." i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks. there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the army and the marines. if the united states was put in a position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, five or six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the reasons i was able to get through the chairman is i try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- they have been on the hill, the beginnings of them, have been on the hill for the better part of the year. they are reductions both chiefs of the services and the chairman support. clearly, and i did as well, when i was chairman over a year ago. there was a need to come down. there was an expectation to do that as we move from what was a couple
in the oregon massacre again at the hands of a gun and a perpetrator that is now dead and to say i thank bob costa for having the courage to get on national tv and speak to those who are rabid sports fans and say it's time for some form of gun regulation. the tragedy that occurred with the nfl player and his girlfriend speaks volumes to the idea of individuals who don't need to have guns in their hands. this phenomenon that guns don't kill, people do, is a trite and redundant and a ridiculous statement. we understand that guns have to have someone at their -- at their trigger, but the idea is with no regulations about those who had previous offenses, no regulations dealing with those who've had mental health issues, no regulations for the gun show loophole that you can go in and buy guns on top of guns, it is time to reflect and i think the sports committee could work with us to assure that america realizes there's nothing wrong withstanding up for gun regulation. let me offer sympathy to the brent and brown families to the nfl family and those concerned about athlete in pro ball, that we c
that as well as the american people. a lot can happen. just as bob said it -- i said in my remarks that the tax issue could get resolved this weekend or it could get resolved at the beginning of next year. it will get resolved. almost all americans will not pay higher taxes next year. but it could happen this weekend. >> the meeting ends today, if there is a proposal put on the table, we're hearing about smaller-scale proposals to get enough republican support in the senate, and not just get 60 votes. do you need an estate tax -- is it ok if it's just different income and unemployment? >> it would be best to let senator mcconnell and others meet with the president today and have them talk about that in private. probably the meeting that happens today is more for optics and probably the substance occurs after that when staff begins to talk. they ought to work on that together, and i think it is best for me not to comment on what should or should not be in it. i want to come back to this -- the 112th congress has scored, litigated, debated every one of the issues that lamar and i are talking abou
with the top democrat on the house budget committee, chris van hollen, along with bob corker and mark warner. and then at 9:00 eastern, president obama and house speaker john boehner. they also spoke about the fiscal cliff today. the president said republicans might be willing to agree to higher tax rates on the wealthy in january. then the house speaker called on the obama administration to respond to the republicans' deficit reduction proposal that was released earlier this week. president obama is at 9:00 eastern and then speaker boehner. at the museum today, florida senator marco rubio sat down with michaelen of "politico." he answered questions about the fiscal cliff. republican outreach to hispanic voters and a potential campaign for president. this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you very much. you had a late night. >> not really. >> is bob still here? what would you like to ask senator rubio? [laughter] >> are you still doing this? >> ask him a real question. this is a great chance. >> last night you talked about a new direction for the republican party. and one of the things that
bob casey cheers this joint economic committee hearing. it is one hour and 45 minutes. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would d
by reaching hosted by bob casey. senator bob casey of hearing. >> the committee will come to order. we want to thank everyone for being here today. i did not have a chance to personally greet our witnesses, but i will have time to do that later. i want to thank both of our witnesses for being here. i will have an opening statement that i will make, and then i will turn it to dr. burgess. i know that vice chairman brady will be her as well. we know the challenges that we confront here in congress on a whole range of issues, which are sometimes broadly described under the umbrella of the terminology, fiscal cliff. when we confront those difficult challenges, we have to ask ourselves a couple of basic questions. one of the basic questions we must ask is, what will be the result and will be the impact as it relates to middle income families? what will happen to them in the midst of all these tough issues we have to work out? we know there is broad agreement that going over the so-called fiscal cliff would jeopardize the economic recovery. it would do that by increasing taxes on families, haltin
into the hospital in michigan, one of the fellows i met there was bob dole. we became friends. when i asked him, what are your plans, and he, without hesitating said i am going to be a county clerk, after that i will run for the state house and when there is an opening in congress, that is where i will go. i said, that is a good idea. i went to law school and became assistant prosecutor. when the territory office became available, i ran for that office. when state could came along, i got to congress. -- statehood came along, i got to congress. >> you were in the territorial legislature before you got here. >> two terms in the house and a term in the senate. sparks then you came here as a member of the house. who did you come here with it? >> only one member. you mentioned senator dole and the fact you had been in the hospital with him in michigan. it is amazing how some of these relationships were formed before public service. the senator from wyoming house and senate and meeting him when he was a boy scout together. you have a relationship with bob dole. >> the other is phil. the hospital is n
to the top republicans since 1986, serving republican leader bob michael, newt gingrich, speaker hastert and john boehner and floor assistant as the general clerk for republican leader john rose and assist ant manager for the republican cloakroom. his experience has been invaluable to all of us who serve here in the house of representatives. jay is known for his vast knowledge of the rules, for his vast knowledge of the traditions and history and the procedures of the house of representatives. and he has been a teacher and a coach to so many members of the congress over the years and we're grateful to his dedication and that he has given this institution over the past 34 years. jay was born in santa barbara, california and graduated from westmont college. jay has a master's degree and pd in english literature. he and his wife have two grown sons, joel and jay. jay is a man of faith and he has his party in the right place. several years ago, he said politics must be secondary to faith and to life. ultimate answers don't lie in politic. no matter what we do or legislate, we won't solve the
'neill did, the way clinton did with bob dole, and newt gingrich. there is a long history of this. it means people getting into a room and preventing what we all want to prevent, and if we share the same goal, there should be a way for us to reach it. i am sorry that the house yesterday was unable to pass that the resolution, which was obviously a rebuke to their leader, but hopefully over their recess, when the come back after christmas, there will be cooler heads prevail in, and the president will begin serious negotiations. thanks. >> coming up on c-span, the national rifle association ceo. following that, senators feinstein and blumenthal. after that, secretary arnie duncan talks about safety in schools. tomorrow on "washington journal" we look at the so- called disco cliff and other -- fiscal cliff. our guest is stephen dinan. then a look at the colombo and shootings and the recent tragedy in the newtown shootings. washington journal is live here on c-span. >> if you work for him, you sometimes get a generous or overbearing or cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. many of his a
in herndon is here to talk to us about the consequences for small businesses. bob. [applause] hello -- >> hello. i own an embroidery franchise out in herndon, va., and we work for small businesses, schools, corporations. i'm happy to be here today to talk to you about the fiscal cliff and how it might affect my business. i am mostly optimistic about our economy in the future, i have grave concerns about what is going on in congress and the potential fiscal cliff we are facing and the elimination of the tax cuts. a lot of the small business owners i talked to and know are in favor of keeping the tax cuts in place especially for the middle class. we believe in balanced approach and we think it's ok to allow the elimination of the tax cuts for the wealthy. as taxes increase, the taxes at my business will be effected and i will have less to pay for investments and new equipment, hiring new people, but personally my income tax rates will go up. it's already a financially constrained environment. but customers tax rates will go up creating less demand for my products and less revenue for
, so many who wanted to speak. but i want to say to you what i said bob wright of autism speech earlier today. i think you for caring about somebody other than your children and ourselves. because what you're doing here today is raising this issue so that other children, other than those that may be in your own family, maybe your friends, will benefit in the future. you're touching the future and you're making it possible for those who are going through the optimism -- the hottest inspector disorders to have a better future. so -- the autism spectrin disorders to have a better future. so i urge you to stay the course. one thing i have learned in 17 years is that, in order for these causes to move forward, you have to keep banging the drum. and you must bang it louder and louder in presenting your case so that, after it is all over, as my mother would say, motion, commotion, emotion and no results. i want you to be successful in what you're doing. life is short. so we must try to use our energy so that we can get the best possible results. i am so glad the chairman said what he said abou
york, bob mendez from new jersey and i believe senator gillibrand will be here shortly. the senators have been a strong partners in this rebuilding effort. it is a great privilege to work together. we are really strong team we share the value of a quick action and sufficient resources to get this job done. as i mentioned, we are in the largest transportation. in the country and it takes diligence and skill of our friends and colleagues. senator schumer. >> thank you, mr. chairman. first, thank you for this hearing but also for your great partnership. new york and new jersey were together as a bipartisan by- date delegation along with our colleagues from rest of the northeast to deal with this awful, awful devastation. it is good you are in so many important positions that will have a lot of say in how we deal with this and we're grateful forthank you, ranking , senator wicker. west hamilton beach was in my old congressional district. it is one of the few volunteer fire departments in new york city. it is right on the water, the great jamaica bay. the generosity of mississippi to west
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